Sturdy and Serviceable

lo entenderás cuando llegue tu Healing Buttsex


Blanket Permission
teapot
brown_betty
I give blanket permission to anyone who wants to use my fic as a stepping-off point for fannish creation.

By this I mean, if you consider yourself part of fandom, and are doing the thing for fandom, go right ahead; you don't need to ask, but I'd love it if you'd drop me a link when you finish.

If you wish to use it for academic, journalistic, commercial, or any other purposes, please contact me for permission.

Special permission to podficcers: if you want to mess with dialogue tags to make it flow better, go right ahead. If it's not in your fandom and you want help with pronunciations, you can hit me up.

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

(no subject)
teapot
brown_betty
I feel obliged to draw attention to a creative work in which I participated, mine and [personal profile] commodorified's KEEPIN' IT RIEL - A STORY OF LOVE, POLITICS AND HOCKEY IN THREE PERIODS ACTS, written for the bad bang.

If you are not familiar with the Bad Bang, it is deliberate badfic.

If you are not familiar with Louis Riel, you are probably not Canadian.

It is written by Marna, and illustrated by me, and it is self-indulgent and terrible. I regret only that I could not induce Marna to work in an "Every dog in Quebec" joke.

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

(no subject)
teapot
brown_betty
So I recently watched all of the first season of the BBC's The Musketeers and it is a good time, in a very specific way.

Our Cast:


Athos:


Lookit this handsome fox. Hobbies include: staring off into the middle distance musing on his tragic backstory, and drinking.

Aramis:


Lookit this fierce panther. Hobbies include: ladies, married ladies, looking alarmingly fine in a hat, chemistry with Porthos, drinking.

Porthos:


Lookit this handsome bear. Hobbies include: abusing melons, hurling explosives, drinking.

D'Artagnan:


Lookit this floppy-haired, antelope-eyed moppet. Hobbies include: crushing on musketeers, swearing vengeance, head wounds.

The "Plot"
The plot of any given episode will be made up of a combination of the following:

Is the Cardinal up to something!?!? (Yes)

The Musketeers meet a woman in peril! Will they save her? Will one of the Musketeers make a love connection?!? (Answer yes to one (1) of the preceding.)

The result of this is that compulsory heterosexuality does a lot of heavy lifting, and sometimes does not quite manage.

Single Episode Romances:

Ranked from most, to least convincing.Collapse )

Other observations:

Santiago Cabrera as Aramis wears a hat better than any man I've seen since Óscar Jaenada's Cougar in the Losers. Is this just something Spanish-speaking men learn? Generally, a hat on a man says "I haven't washed my hair in a while, or am really into sport, possibly both." Aramis' hat-wearing is in a completely different category.

I make fun of Aramis for being into married women, (and he is!) but actually everyone but Porthos seems into married women.  I mean, in Athos' case, she's married to him (it's complicated) but there's definitely a trend.

Except for one episode, Aramis' womanizing is usually sold as "likes women" and it really comes across that way.  He has approximately 0% chemistry with Agnes, (which I feel was a good choice, since hitting on grieving widows is hard to make look good, but it made her invitation for him to run away with them a bit of a hard sell.  Maybe she was looking for an au par?) but seems to genuinely respect and admire her.

If I had to justify the entire season, I would point to the episode where nuns under siege hurl molatov cocktails and an entire beehive at their attackers.  It's a great thirty seconds.

Perhaps because "hates women" is hard character note to sell nowadays, Athos is instead mostly characterized by being very brusque, and not noticing when women are hitting on him.   This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

(no subject)
teapot
brown_betty
I discovered the other day something that maybe those who come from a tradition of latkes already know, which is that slightly squidgy potatoes make the best latkes.

Read more...Collapse )

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

Podcast sampler
teapot
brown_betty

As a public-transit user, I am becoming a connoisseur of podcasts, and I wanted to mention a couple I have been enjoying.

I have also discovered, as part of this, that I cannot listen to a bunch of dudes who are vaguely aware that feminism, is, like, a thing? do cultural criticism. Like, I can't hack more than one episode of How Did This Get Made.  It just turns out that I require a feminist lens in all my cultural criticism. However, if it's just trivia-podcasting, it apparently doesn't matter to me so much.

The Worst Best Sellers: What it sounds like: a couple of lady friends get together and read a popular terrible book. From this podcast I learned that there exists a reality TV show where Vanilla Ice lives among the Amish, and that it has a second season. Is this the most reality TV thing reality TV has yet produced?

Sailor Business: If you remember fondly the 90s anime dub of Sailor Moon, you will probably enjoy this podcast. Chris Sims and some other dude review each episode of Sailor Moon, and they are not ashamed to love everything about them.

I Don't Even Own a Television: Irregularly updating, but similar to The Worst Bestsellers, reviews terrible books, along with a guest. I found it because they reviewed A Spell For Chameleon, and it's important to me to watch people encountering this book.

No Such Thing as a Fish: Described as "A weekly podcast in which The QI researchers share their most interesting recent discoveries," which doesn't fully prepare you for their comic timing. The most "produced" of all the podcasts on this list.


Do any of you listen to any of these, or others? Please feel free to tell me about podcasts you enjoy!

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

(no subject)
teapot
brown_betty
Everything the Internet has promised you about Jupiter Ascending is true.

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

Agent Carter
teapot
brown_betty
Like most people, I am enjoying the crap out of Agent Carter, but in particular in this episode I enjoyed:

four out of five ear-pullsCollapse )

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

Update to Miss Universe Costume post
teapot
brown_betty
[personal profile] glvalentine has done the Miss Universe Costume Post you were waiting for.

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

Can we talk about the Miss Universe Costumes?
teapot
brown_betty
Like, I feel slightly embarrassed by Miss Canada, but I also feel like, on some level, she won. It's so bonkers it comes out the other side.

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)

Let's talk about books!
teapot
brown_betty
Gather around, young ones. Once upon a time, when a publisher found that a book was no longer selling enough copies to cover the cost of another print run, they stopped printing it. (It was a dark time.) When this happened, if you wanted a copy, basically your only hope was to find someone who owned a copy and mug them, or to haunt second-hand book stores, waiting for a copy.1

So, Fellow Olds, what was that book, for you? The one you spent years yearning for, stalking all the used book stores in your city, and several further afield? Did you find it? Was it worth it?

Is it now available as an ebook?

For me, this book was the third in a series, The Tales of the Nedao, by Ru Emerson. Ru Emerson was probably most active in the late eighties and early nineties, and I think she compares well with other authors of that time, such as Mercedes Lackey, and Robin McKinley. Tales of the Nedao was the story of a princess who leads her people in exile. The first book was mostly about their escape from their enemies, but all the princess's struggle to be an active leader rather than a figurehead. The second book is about the establishment of their city, securing the resources they need to live, beginning diplomatic relations with surrounding peoples, and fighting off their enemies.

Also, she had a magical telepathic cat, so you can understand why I name-checked Lackey.

And there I was stuck, for perhaps two years, until I found all three in a used book store. I purchased the third, and left cackling, with no remorse for the pain I was inflicting on some future buyer. Let them suffer as I have suffered!

The third book was a fantastic let-down. I'm not sure if it would have been if I hadn't been waiting for it for so long, but in the third book, she is kidnapped and raped by her sorcerous enemy, and there is some "oh no, my babies!" peril. I was probably not as rabidly feminist then as I am now, so I found it mostly unpleasant and distressing, rather than irritating. She does eventually get to stab the hell out of her enemy, so there's that.

Anyway, all are available now as ebooks, but if the described does not appeal to you, I recommend instead her book The Princess of Flames, which has a lot of the same "Princess against the odds" elements, but with bonus tarot, and girls dressed as boys.

Also, it is not available as ebook (at least, not in a type-set, professional way, although the internet seems eager to provide) so you can also share my book-store experience.

1. At this point, generally, the rights reverted to the author, but the economics of the situation did not change, so unless the author was a little nutty and decided to self-publish at a loss, that was usually the end of it. Nowadays, once the rights revert, the author generally starts selling it as an ebook.

This post also on dreamwidth (comment count unavailable comments)